Vision is not static

 

 

Of all our senses-Smell, Hearing, Sight, Taste and Touch,

sight-vision  is our most developed.  It is our dominant sense and the means by which the average person receives the vast majority of their information and education. 

It has been shown that nearly 85% of all of the information that we gather in a lifetime is taken into our minds through our eyes.

The quality of our vision, how well and truly we are seeing, to a great extent determines the quality of our personal reality which shapes how we live our lives.

 

The information that we take in our eyes is the raw material from which we create our own sense of reality.  The context that is based upon past experiences determines our behavior in present circumstances.  Perhaps even more importantly, our eyes are the only organs of our bodies that are actually outgrowths of our brain.

 The eye’s retina is in reality, a specialized form of brain tissue.  This makes the interconnection and interrelationship between our eyes and our brain the most profound organic relationship on our body in our being. 

 The information taken in by the eyes is processed by the brain more deeply and completely, than the information that we receive through all our other senses.

 Eyes & Brain are a team

As we exchange our perceptions of what we can and cannot see, we can become more open to viewing the world as a whole new adventure.

We ride our bike down a country road watching for pot holes, frogs or sticks.  We end up maneuvering around these objects and adjust our speed, while visually monitoring our position.

 

Moments later we might get into our car, drive to the grocery store past fields with turkeys, ducks and geese always judging where we are relative to other vehicles and the flow of traffic. We arrive at our destination having made numerous conscious and subconscious judgments with varying degrees.  Whether it is shopping for groceries, watching a ball game or reading the news paper our vision plays an essential role in each of these activities through the collaboration of eyes and brain.

Vision occurs neither in the eyes nor in the brain, but emerges from the collaboration of the eyes, the visual pathway and the brain. Vision is a pervasive aspect of our existence which permeates all of our activities. Vision develops and, due to neural plasticity, can be enhanced. Optometry is the discipline dedicated to the care of all aspects of the visual process.

                                         Eyes are ruled by the brain

Seeing takes place in the our brain, not in our eyes.

Being able to understand esophoric and exophoric behavior opens up a window into how we experience our world. What one sees, how we perceive, interpret and react is all a result of our individual inner world.

Esophoria (Eso)- (clinical condition) a tendency of the eyes to want to turn more inward than necessary when an individual is viewing an object at near or at distance, which may cause the individual to experience eyestrain and other symptoms.

The esophoric child uses many references to him/herself with I’s and me’s.  He/she asks of every test, “How did I do? Did I do it well?  Did I do it right?”

Esophores tend to:

  • Be introverted.
  • Look closer and judge space incorrectly.
  • Receives information better from the printed (seeing) word than from the spoken (auditory) word.

 

 

  •  Dislike being corrected.
  • Make careless mistakes.
  • Read word for word.

 Symptoms:

  • Headaches.
  • Blurred vision.
  • Eyestrain.
  • Intermittent double vision.

 Exophoria (Exo)- (clinical condition) a tendency of the eyes to want to turn more outward than necessary when an individual is viewing an object at near or at distance, which may cause the individual to experience eyestrain and other symptoms. 

  The Exophoric Child tends to relate his/her space world as a complete totality with him/herself as part of it in his alignment which is an outwardizing movement. His/her performance should be complimented rather than him/her as an individual.

 

 Exophores tend to:

  • Not center in.
  • Not sustain near point attention, but tend to look away.
  • Daydream.

 

 

  • Have lower identification skills.
  • See where something is and not what it is. 
  • Miss detail.
  • Jump from field to field to take in information.

 Symptoms:

  • Eyestrain.
  • Headaches.
  • Blurred vision distance and near.
  • Double vision at far and near.
  • Sleepiness.
  • Difficulty concentration on reading material.
  • Decreasing comprehension over time
  • Pulling sensation around the eyes.
  • Print appears to move.

Life after stroke

NATIONAL STROKE ASSOCIATION

TYPES OF REHABILITATION

There are three primary means of rehabilitation.

Physical therapy (PT) helps restore physical functioning and skills like walking and range of movement. Major impairments which PT works on include partial or one-sided paralysis, faulty balance and foot drop.

Occupational therapy (OT) involves relearning the skills needed for everyday living such as eating, toileting, dressing and taking care of oneself.

Speech language pathology is another major rehabilitative therapy. Some stroke survivors are left with aphasia, an impairment of language and speaking skills in which the stroke survivor can think as well as before the stroke, but is unable to get the right words out or is unable to process words coming in. Aphasia is usually caused by a stroke on the left side of the brain. Speech language pathology can teach the aphasic stroke survivor and his or her family members methods for coping with this frustrating impairment. Speech language pathologists also work to help the stroke survivor cope with memory loss and other “thought” problems caused by the stroke.

Vision Therapy (VT) Many stroke survivors have visual problems following their strokes. To be able to see well, the brain and the eyes have to work together. Because part of the brain is damaged in a stroke, vision problems can be partial or complete loss of sight. Stroke survivors may also experience blurred vision, confusion or difficulty in performing visual activities, and eye strain. For stroke survivors with vision problems, it’s harder to go back to work or even perform simple household tasks. As soon as possible after a stroke, stroke survivors should have a complete eye exam to find out if their eyes are healthy. This exam will uncover any stroke-related vision problems. Opthalmologists or optometrists are important members of a stroke patient’s rehabilitation team. They can diagnose specific problems and recommend a treatment plan. Different types of vision therapy are available to retrain, strengthen, or sharpen vision following stroke. One new form of therapy, NovaVision VRT(TM), uses a computer-like device to help improve eye sight after stroke. The goal of the therapy is to train healthy parts of the brain to perform the work of the part of the brain damaged by stroke. According to research, neither the age of the patient nor when the stroke occurred makes a difference in the effectiveness of this type of therapy